Beaumont Ranch Offers a Taste of Texas Ranch Culture

family owned business Beaumont Ranch is a beautiful guest ranch that offers an event center and outdoor adventure resort.  The ranch is situated on 800 acres in the beautiful rolling hills of Grandview, Texas. North Texas residents go there for “recreation, relaxation and revelry.”  Beaumont Ranch, Just 30 minutes south of the Dallas, welcomes visitors from across the globe who are looking for an appreciation of Texas and Texan culture that can best be found at family-owned and operated guest ranches. We applaud family owned business in Texas.

Beaumont Ranch is a working cattle ranch as well as a vacation resort

Serving as more than a southern resort, Beaumont Ranch is a working cattle ranch with herds of Texas longhorns, horses, llamas, and other local wildlife.  The Ranch specializes in corporate and private client entertainment, with two 20,000 square foot event barns.  The facility offers rustic guest cabins, luxury suites, and outdoor adventure activities guided by true Texas cowboys.

The Beaumont Ranch remains a family owned business

Since the Beaumonts opened the Texas guest ranch in 1997, they have stayed faithful to their commitment to put family first.  So, if you have the privilege of visiting the facility many of the folks you will encounter are children, grandchildren and the extended family. A family owned business can always benefit from important planning.

Why You Need a Disaster Plan for your ranch animals

Operating a family cattle ranch is a common venture in Texas.  It involves a huge investment requiring substantial work and the resulting business can be passed down from generation to generation.  Ranch owners will do everything possible to protect that investment for the future of their family.  But how many ranch owners have considered the need for a disaster plan for their cattle, horses and other ranch animals?  Having insurance in place is simply not enough. Being able to avoid an enormous loss altogether is a much better prospect.

Disaster preparedness is critical for ranchers

Disaster preparedness should be a part of every ranch or farm owner’s overall business plan.  If you think about it, a disaster plan is essentially a plan for protecting your business assets.  If you consider the size of livestock, horses and other typical ranch animals, you know that sheltering and transporting them can be a substantial burden.  That burden can be overwhelming if you are faced with an emergency situation and you are not prepared.  Since disasters are nearly impossible to predict, whether its tornados, flooding or barn fires, it is vital to have a plan.  Decisions about whether to evacuate or shelter in place, for example, should be before disaster strikes.

Establish your plan ahead of time

It is always better to take precautions now for the unexpected, and hope you never actually need to use the plan.  A comprehensive disaster plan should include all of your ranch property and assets, including your structures, equipment and animals.  Start by generating a complete list of emergency telephone numbers, including your employees, neighbors, veterinarians, local animal shelter, trailering resources, and any other important contacts. It is wise for at least some of these contacts to be located outside of the potential disaster area, if at all possible.

Deciding whether it is best to shelter in place

Evacuation is not always possible because you may not have sufficient time or it may be safer for your farm animals to stay in place.  This typically depends on the nature of the potential threat.  If you decide to shelter in place, then you need to know whether to leave your large animals confined in a shelter, such as a barn, or whether to leave them out in the pasture.  Although many people assume their animals are safest in a barn, confinement can also deny many animals the benefit of their instinctual ability to protect themselves.

Preparing for a potential barn fire

Statistically, barn fire is one of the most common disasters affecting livestock. The best way to guard against barn fires is to take as many steps as possible to prevent them.  To do that, you should recognize how barn fires are typically started, what the potential risks are, and how to minimize those risks.  Regrettably, only a few minutes of heat and smoke can destroy thousands of dollars’ worth of equipment, saddles, hay, as well as the barn itself.

If you have questions regarding disaster plans for farms, or any other family owned business planning needs, please contact The Vermillion Law Firm, LLC for a consultation either online or by calling us toll free at (888) 567-5745.